Azelaic Acid and Topical Niacinamide acne treatment


Azelaic acid is known for its anti-bacterial action and its ability to normalize abnormal keratinization of the skin. With continuous use of azelaic acid there would be a reduction in propionibacterium acnes bacteria. Another beneficial effect of azelaic is the reduction of microcomedo formation that leads to whiteheads and blackheads. Upon application, azelaic acid imparts a stinging or burning sensation of the skin which last for about 15-20 minutes. The side effect of azelaic acid is considered to be very mild and minimal compared to topical benzoyl peroxide.

In multi therapy treatment, we can combine the antibacterial and keratolytic property of azelaic acid with the anti-inflammatory property of topical niacinamide. Thus, azelaic acid kills the germs and exfoliates the skin while topical niacinamide keeps down the redness and size of inflammed pimples. It is also an additional property of topical niacinamide to keep the skin hydrated acting as a mild moisturizer.

Dosage and Application

Azelaic acid is available under the brand name Azelex or Skinoren which is available at 20% concentration. Topical niacinamide can be bought over the counter or you can make your own DIY topical niacinamide like the one presented on the main page of this site. Metazene is an example of a commercial 5% Topical niacinamide. It is recommended to use fast drying topical niacinamide in hydroalcholic base or gel base.

Procedure for topical application:

1. Wash your face first with soap and water to remove dirt and oil.
2. Pat dry with towel.
3. Apply the topical niacinamide serum or gel on the face or other affected areas.
4. Allow the topical niacinamide to dry for several minutes.
5. Apply the Azelaic Acid cream on the face and leave it overnight.

References

Using Aldara, copper peptide, and niacinamide for skin care. Aesthetic Surgery Journal, Volume 24, Issue 1, Pages 83-84
J. Carraway

W Gehring (2004) Nicotinic acid/niacinamide and the skin Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology 3 (2), 88–93.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/medmaster/a603020.html ( Last update – 10/01/2003 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. )

Br J Dermatol 1988 Nov;119(5):627-632 Inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase activity in human skin by zinc and azelaic acid. Stamatiadis D, Bulteau-Portois MC, Mowszowicz I , Laboratoire de Biochimie B, Hopital Necker-Enfants-Malades, Paris, France.

Azelaic Acid and Niacinamide for Acne | Azelaic Acid Niacinamide Acne Treatment | Niacinamide Azelaic Acid

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